News


Welcome to the USLA News Page. Scroll down to read the news. Find out what’s going on around the region. Share news with your USLA neighbors.

NYS DEC seeks comment on proposed upgrade to Fish Creek Campgrounds

September 27, 2020

NYS DEC proposes an upgrade and modernization for the Fish Creek Campgrounds.  Please review and send your comments to NYS DEC. Water quality in Upper Saranac Lake is directly affected by activities at the campground. USLA members are encouraged to send your comments soon.

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NYS DEC proposes an upgrade and modernization for the Fish Creek Campgrounds.  Please review and send your comments to NYS DEC. Water quality in Upper Saranac Lake is directly affected by activities at the campground. USLA members are encouraged to send your comments soon.

Follow the link for complete information and Upper Saranac Foundation recommendations: https://usfoundation.net/newsfeed/usf-provides-comments-for-dec-fish-creek-management-plan/

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Census Flyer for Seasonal Homeowners

September 02, 2020

To all Seasonal Homeowners:  

Review this attached flyer for important information about the 2020 US Census. Following these... continue

To all Seasonal Homeowners:  

Review this attached flyer for important information about the 2020 US Census. Following these instructions ensures all properties are counted!

For any property you own but only use part of the time, follow these instructions:

1. Visit https://my2020census.gov/

2. Enter the Census ID or address for this secondary property

3. Enter “0” for the number of people living at this property

4. Hit Next, and when a “soft error” occurs, click Next again

5. Select “No” when asked to confirm no person lives at this property

6. Select primary reason – Seasonal (most likely)

7. Complete

 

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ADIRONDACK WATER WEEK 2020

August 26, 2020

Please join the Paul Smith's College Adirondack Water Institute for Water Week taking place virtually from... continue

Please join the Paul Smith's College Adirondack Water Institute for Water Week taking place virtually from Sunday, 8/23 through Friday, 8/28, and celebrate one of our most precious and valued resources in the Adirondacks, our freshwater.

Learn more about our aquatic resources and discover ways you can take action to protect our waterways. This year's inaugural event focuses on the Legacy of Adirondack Waters and features a week-long Speaker Series and an Aquatic Invasive Species Spread Prevention Certification Training program. Detailed information on this free event can be found here.

I hope you will join us to celebrate our Adirondack waters!

Sincerely, 

Dan Kelting 

Daniel L Kelting 
Executive Director 
Adirondack Watershed Institute 
Paul Smith’s College 
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Welcome Home from ADK Health

July 04, 2020

Dear Friends, 

Welcome home! 

On behalf of Adirondack Health, we hope this message finds you and your loved ones safe and well. We wanted to reach out with some guidance and best practices to ensure as safe a summer as possible for... continue

Dear Friends, 

Welcome home! 

On behalf of Adirondack Health, we hope this message finds you and your loved ones safe and well. We wanted to reach out with some guidance and best practices to ensure as safe a summer as possible for everyone.  Read here or download the PDF.

The summer season is here, and, so far, our region has largely been spared from the catastrophic spread of COVID-19. To date, we appear to have successfully limited the reach of the virus by implementing early social and physical distancing measures, backed up by the natural protection of our mountains and rural location. However, we are concerned that could change when our population increases over the summer.

Our region may emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic as a public health success story, with our population safe and healthy. But despite our initial success, we remain highly vulnerable to infected persons and asymptomatic carriers of the virus coming from out of the area, whether they are year-round residents, second homeowners, guests of homeowners, athletes or tourists. It will take all of us working together to keep the virus in check.

We are asking members of our community who will be returning in the coming weeks and months to please keep up to date on the latest federal and state guidance, which can (and does) evolve weekly, if not daily.

  • It is best to go directly to your destination and not stop for supplies along the way. The state of New York has mandated additional precautions for those traveling from certain states with relatively higher infection rates. The current list of such states is available at coronavirus.health.ny.gov/covid-19-travel-advisory.
     
  • Please consider being tested for COVID-19 at the earliest appropriate opportunity following your arrival. Adirondack Health offers testing – visit adirondackhealth.org/covid-testing for our current schedule.
     
  • If you are experiencing respiratory distress, shortness of breath, dry cough, fever, or any other potential COVID-19 symptoms, contact the Adirondack Health COVID Clinic at 518-897-2462 to receive instructions on accessing appropriate care. The full list of symptoms is available at cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html
  • Comply with all local, state, and federal directives and recommendations regarding physical distancing and other measures to limit spread of the virus.
     
  • Wear face masks in public places when physical distancing is difficult.
     
  • Refrain from hosting or attending large gatherings and utilize physical distancing measures, such as entertaining outdoors, using disposable flatware, plates and glasses, providing guests individual servings, and wearing masks inside when keeping six feet apart is difficult. New York State Department of Health guidance on gatherings is available at coronavirus.health.ny.gov/travel-large-gatherings-and-quarantines.
     
  • Be diligent with handwashing and disinfecting much-used surfaces.
     
  • Limit trips to the grocery store.

Local businesses are working hard to adapt to the current situation and are under strict regulations as part of New York state’s phased approach to reopening. We encourage you to abide by any such limitations, which are meant to protect all of us.

We look forward to welcoming all who make our region such a special place. We know this season will be unlike any before, and it will take some time to adjust to the new normal, but we’ll get there.

In closing, thank you for weighing all this information as you consider a return to the Adirondacks.  If you wish to receive continue receiving periodic updates of this nature, please contact Hannah Hanford in the Foundation office at hhanford@adirondackhealth.org to be placed on an email list.

We look forward to being back together again as soon as possible, in a safe and responsible manner. Our skilled, compassionate clinicians are well prepared to care for all who seek our services. Although we hope you won’t need us, we are here if you do.

Sincerely,

 

 

 

Sylvia Getman
President and CEO
Adirondack Health
518-897-2301

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USLA Webcam Relocation

June 30, 2020

The USLA webcam is currently offline while it is being relocated to a new site. Check back to visit the webcam in the next few weeks.

The USLA webcam is currently offline while it is being relocated to a new site. Check back to visit the webcam in the next few weeks.

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Governor says North Country can start limited reopening this weekend

May 13, 2020

WATERTOWN — Gov. Andrew Cuomo, speaking at Jefferson Community College Wednesday morning, said the North Country has met all the parameters to reopen some businesses starting Friday.
 
The last of seven criteria the region need to meet was 30 per... continue
WATERTOWN — Gov. Andrew Cuomo, speaking at Jefferson Community College Wednesday morning, said the North Country has met all the parameters to reopen some businesses starting Friday.
 
The last of seven criteria the region need to meet was 30 per 1,000 residents tested for COVID-19 each month. The requirement is to reach 419 tests per day, and the region met that goal today with 454 tests per day.
 
The region has 52% of its hospital beds available, meeting and exceeding the 30% requirement. Hospitals also have 68% of its intensive care unit beds, meeting and exceeding the 30% requirement.
 
The region has also met the requirement of having 30 contact tracers for every 100,000 residents in the region.
 
The state closed down all nonessential businesses under the New York State on PAUSE executive order after the coronavirus pandemic hit in March.
 
The North Country and other regions cleared to start reopening will be able to restart the construction, manufacturing, agriculture, forestry and fishing sectors, and allow retail stores to provide curbside pickup this weekend. Statewide, some activities deemed “low-risk” can also reopen, such as landscaping, gardening, tennis and drive-in movie theaters.
 
Other industries will be reopened in phases, at the direction of a regional panel. The regional panels will be tasked with keeping an eye on the number of hospital deaths and the regional rates of transmission, and may recommend adjustments to openings if necessary.
 
The area defined by the state as the North Country includes Jefferson, Lewis, St. Lawrence, Franklin, Clinton, Essex and Hamilton counties.
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USLA Member Dr. Neil A. "Tony" Holtzman offers commentary on Visiting the Adirondacks in the time of COVID-19

May 12, 2020

When to lift the restrictions under which we've been living since March should depend on local conditions. In New York City, where the number of new cases of COVID-19 is still over 2,500 per day, a major concern is "flattening the curve." On the other hand, in some North... continue
When to lift the restrictions under which we've been living since March should depend on local conditions. In New York City, where the number of new cases of COVID-19 is still over 2,500 per day, a major concern is "flattening the curve." On the other hand, in some North Country counties, days may go by without a new case and a major concern is jobs. Employment in the Adirondacks is heavily dependent on tourists, but they might bring the coronavirus with them. The risks posed by tourists and other visitors and how they can be monitored and minimized is the subject of this column.  "On visiting the Adirondacks in the time of COVID-19Adirondack Daily Enterprise 12 May 2020 
 
What is the chance that visitors to the North Country will bring the coronavirus with them? Even people who have sheltered in place and practiced safe distancing can harbor the virus without showing symptoms. Visitors to the Adirondacks could contract the virus en route on airplanes, trains, buses and in automobiles when they stop for gas, food, restrooms and lodging.  
 
There are not enough tests to check visitors for the virus or for antibodies to the virus before they enter. Antibodies have not yet been proven to protect against infection. Moreover, some tests for the virus (PCR and antigen) may give worrisome false negative results and tests for antibodies worrisome false positive results. What, then, should be done to prevent visitors from infecting year-round Adirondack residents?  
 
Health officers in North Country counties recommend that people entering their respective counties voluntarily quarantine in their homes for 14 days. This is most easily accomplished for people with second homes in those counties who plan on staying for more than two weeks. (Full disclosure: I am in that category.) If they develop signs of COVID-19 during their quarantine, the county health department should be promptly notified. If they are healthy at the end of their quarantine, they should adhere to the rules and recommendations that apply to year-round residents. 
Backpackers from out of the region who camp in the backcountry but seldom stay for more than 14 days should be able to enter. They should be warned to safe-distance from others and to promptly turn around if they show signs of COVID-19. A forest ranger, if they meet one, can arrange to have them tested for the virus. 
 
More problematic are the many who come for two weeks or less to camp, hike, swim, fish, kayak and canoe. If public and private campgrounds agree to maintain safe distancing between families and frequently disinfect facilities used in common such as tables, showers and restrooms, they should be able to open on a trial basis. Here, too, anyone who develops symptoms of COVID-19 should be reported promptly to the local county health department.  
 
In these three categories - second homeowners, backpackers and campers - the local health departments should test all suspected cases of COVID-19 for the virus, quarantine those who test positive, trace and test all their contacts regardless of whether they have symptoms, and trace and test contacts of the primary contacts. A shortage of valid tests for the virus has reduced the full capability of contact tracing in the North Country. Of seven criteria laid out by Gov. Cuomo for gradually reopening regions within New York, the only two that the North Country counties have not met involve testing. Funds recently authorized by Congress should alleviate these shortages, although more money may be needed.  
 
Most problematic are the visitors who traditionally fit the tourist label - those who come for a few days, stay at motels and hotels, day hike, shop, eat and drink in restaurants and bars, visit museums, theaters, concerts and sports events. They comprise the largest category of visitors and are the most likely to be in contact with many others. They also are the basis for many jobs in the region. It would be prudent to keep the facilities that attract them closed until resources are in place to quickly contact, trace, test and quarantine a large influx of tourists.  
 
Data from comprehensive contact tracing can help local authorities decide whether health care resources in the North Country will be able to manage the number of new cases. If they are, then the number must be low enough to make another epidemic unlikely. If these two criteria can be satisfied, facilities that can maintain safe distancing and sanitary conditions should be allowed to reopen. If these precautions prove successful, then venues and events at which congregating, if not crowding, is an in integral part might be opened in stages.  
 
Contact tracing of visitors who show signs of COVID-19 is essential for safely allowing tourism to return and the businesses and services it supports to flourish without igniting another epidemic.  
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Dr. Neil A. "Tony" Holtzman, MD, MPH, lives in Menlo Park, California, has a second home in the Upper Saranac Lake area and is an emeritus professor of pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He is also the author of the Adirondack Trilogy of novels: "Axton Landing," "The Railroad" and "Forever Wild."
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Important information about Coronavirus in Franklin County

March 27, 2020

The following information has been received from the Franklin County Legislature regarding cases of coronavirus (CoVid-19) in the USLA area.  We provide this to inform our members about the situation in our community.  For additional information about coronavirus in the USLA... continue

The following information has been received from the Franklin County Legislature regarding cases of coronavirus (CoVid-19) in the USLA area.  We provide this to inform our members about the situation in our community.  For additional information about coronavirus in the USLA area, please see the additional links and the USLA website, where we will continue to post information.

Franklin County Legislature Notice

https://www.adirondackhealth.org/coronavirus 

https://coronavirus.health.ny.gov/home 

https://www.co.essex.ny.us/Health/local-covid-19-notices/ 

http://www.protectadks.org/2020/03/coronavirus-in-the-adirondack-park-and-north-country/ .  

You might also read current information in the Adirondack Daily Enterprise (subscription may be required);

https://www.adirondackdailyenterprise.com/news/coronavirus/ 

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Coronavirus in the ADKs

March 25, 2020

From the Adirondack Daily Enterprise 3/25/20:

As people flee COVID-19 hotspots such as New York City and come to the Adirondacks, some — but not all — local officials are publicly urging those visitors to self-quarantine for 14 days before they go to shops or other... continue

From the Adirondack Daily Enterprise 3/25/20:

As people flee COVID-19 hotspots such as New York City and come to the Adirondacks, some — but not all — local officials are publicly urging those visitors to self-quarantine for 14 days before they go to shops or other public places.

Paul Maroun is one of those. He doubles as Tupper Lake village mayor and a Franklin County legislator, and he said the topic came up Tuesday morning in a daily phone conference among Franklin County officials.

Maroun said he knows people have come up to their second homes in the Tupper Lake area from New York City and Westchester County — epicenters of COVID-19 for the entire U.S. — and have then gone shopping in his community. He urged them to stay in self-quarantine for 14 days before they go out to shops or other public places.

The reason, he said, is that they’re more likely to be unwittingly carrying the virus than local residents who haven’t traveled.

“They’re In contact with regular people in the community if they go to a store, if they get take-out,” Maroun said. “They come up here thinking they’re in a cabin. … They go in Shaheen’s (supermarket) and buy $200 worth of meat, well, they’ve potentially infected (several people).”

He said he isn’t trying to stop people from coming here. Instead, he’s pleading with them to help protect the community they enjoy here.

“It’s not to be offensive, not to be mean,” he said. “It’s just common decency.”

So how should someone who just came up from a COVID-19 hotspot get food? Maroun didn’t have a solid answer to that question yet, as of Tuesday morning.

“They could call the stores to see if they can deliver,” he said. “If not, if they go into a store, they should wear a mask and gloves … and maybe have one person instead of everybody.

“If they call the village office, (518) 359-3341, we’ll try to find a way to get it to them. … I’m not saying we would be able to do them all, but …”

Maroun said some Tupper Lakers doubt how dangerous the new coronavirus is, but not him.

“There are still people that don’t believe this,” he said. “The odds are very high something is going to turn up in Franklin County eventually, and we want to be ready for it.

“This isn’t a joke.”

Emergency response

Brendan Keough, chief of the Saranac Lake Volunteer Fire Department, was also on the Tuesday morning conference call. He and other fire chiefs are taking steps to make sure their firefighters don’t get infected.

“Two of our last three fire calls have been people from the city (New York City), and one was a couple staying in an Airbnb,” he said. He didn’t detail the fire calls but said they were typical of the kind his department at this time every year “as people are opening camps and Airbnbs.”

He said his fire department, as well as the Lake Placid, Tupper Lake, Paul Smiths-Gabriels and Bloomingdale volunteer fire departments and the Saranac Lake Police Department and Saranac Lake Volunteer Rescue Squad, are communicating with each other daily and trying to follow similar safety protocols.

The SLVFD has divided itself into two companies — named Woodruff and Miller for local historical figures — that each work 14-day stretches before handing off to the other. That limits the number of firefighters that come into contact with each other. Specialty teams such as diving and ice rescue will respond when those kinds of calls come through.

Thursday is normally the SLVFD’s training day, and this Thursday the department plans to conduct its first fire school class through internet conferencing using WebEx, a program it learned about from Franklin County officials.

“It’s been very useful for us,” Keough said.

Village response

Maroun said the village has also divided its departments’ staff so each worker interacts with fewer people. Similar steps have been taken by municipalities across the state in response to state recommendations.

Maroun also said he informed the governor’s office that Sunmount Developmental Disabilities Services Office in Tupper Lake — a former veterans hospital — has two buildings that could be converted for hospital beds if needed. It would take a lot of work, he added, but the Army Corps of Engineers and Navy Seabees might be able to do it.

“I think the governor has done an excellent job in terms of relaying to the people what’s going on, and I think he’s done an excellent job of (getting services where they’re needed),” Maroun, a Republican, said of Gov. Andrew Cuomo, a Democrat.

How does he feel about the federal government’s handling of the situation?

“I think they’re coming on board,” he said. “It’s very unfortunate they couldn’t pass the stimulus” to get money into hands of people who are out of work. “I think they’re moving in the right direction. They’ve got the smarts. They’ve got the knowledge and the science … but I hope we can move this along a little quicker.”

One state has gone further than just encouraging isolation. As of Tuesday, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis mandated anyone on a flight from New York, New Jersey or Connecticut to self-isolate for 14 days upon their arrival or face criminal penalty.

Rabideau disagrees

Saranac Lake village Mayor Clyde Rabideau doesn’t have the same approach as Maroun or DeSantis when it comes to visitors. He said Saranac Lake supports the current state initiatives and isn’t encouraging anything further. He said it’s not his position to make those calls.

“If somebody owns a house up here and pays taxes on it, they should be able to go to their own home,” he said. “We’re already supposed to be in lockdown and confined and practicing social distancing.”

Officials encourage travel limitations

In a letter released on Tuesday, North Elba Supervisor Jay Rand encouraged visitors to “limit travel to essential only.” It didn’t address self-isolation for visitors from downstate specifically.

The letter supported recent statements and initiatives from Gov. Andrew Cuomo to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. Rand reiterated the governor’s 10-point PAUSE plan, Matilda’s Law and descriptions of essential businesses identified by the state.

Lake Placid is among the busiest tourist destinations in the Adirondacks and home to the most short-term vacation rentals in Essex County. Around 636 rentals on Airbnb and VRBO listed Lake Placid addresses as of Tuesday, according to AirDNA, a vacation rental data and analysis website.

“We’ve got non-essential travel coming into the area, some of which may be occupying vacation rentals and others may be in hotels, which are listed as essential businesses (by the state), but we have no mechanism for stopping that,” Lake Placid village Mayor Craig Randall said in a phone interview Tuesday. Randall didn’t address isolation, but he said he hopes fewer people travel to Lake Placid during the pandemic.

“There’s no reason for people to come here right now,” he said. “There are no businesses. There are no restaurants or bars open. There are no venues here. There are no events going on.”

He read a piece of a public statement he was working on.

“Hotel lodging is a listed essential service,” he said. “However, many of our local lodging establishments have elected to close at this time. Further, some local real estate offices have suspended taking vacation rental reservations during this period.”

Merrill L. Thomas, among the largest local real estate agencies in Lake Placid and owned by former North Elba town Supervisor Roby Politi, announced on social media on Sunday that it would stop accepting vacation rental bookings for the month of April.

“We express our sincere appreciation for this and hope word spreads to others to defer their plans to spend time in Lake Placid until this current emergency has passed,” Randall said.

Between the coronavirus outbreak and the village’s recent adoption of new short-term rental regulations — which among other things establishes a registry and requires owners to apply for a permit to rent out their properties to vacationers — the number of Lake Placid listings online has plummeted in the last few days, though there are still hundreds of listings.

For the last few weeks, Wilmington town Supervisor Roy Holzer, in multiple posts on social media, has called for short-term vacation rental owners in his town to consider a self-imposed moratorium on accepting new bookings for the time being.

“I want to thank our Wilmington vacation rental hosts that have voluntarily ceased renting their places during this difficult and scary time in our world,” he wrote. “In fact, I know of rental owners that have offered their places in Wilmington for voluntary quarantine so the individuals can be reunited with their Wilmington family.”

The co-owner of Woodland Vacations in Wilmington, in a video posted on social media on Sunday, offered one of their short term rentals free to any healthcare worker in need of a place to stay.

The Essex County Board of Supervisors is asking people not to visit the Adirondacks during this time.

In a statement Tuesday, board chairman and Willsboro town Supervisor Shaun Gillilland said the county has limited medical and food resources.

“This is in keeping with federal and state mandates that people stay at home and stay put,” he said. “It is far better for you to stay home and limit your movements.”

Gillilland also encouraged people to pause their vacation rental operations.

“As we work together to minimize the spread of this virus across our most vulnerable populations, we respectfully ask that property owners comply with this request to limit new exposures and protect the health and welfare of all by removing short-term rental listings from services such as Airbnb and Vrbo, and not renting their short-term rentals,” he said.

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Coronavirus in the Adirondacks and the North Country

March 24, 2020

The coronavirus (COVID-19) is spreading throughout New York State. As of March 24th, there were over 25,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in New York, in 53 out of the state’s 62 counties, though many Upstate New York counties face shortages of medical supplies and cannot undertake... continue

The coronavirus (COVID-19) is spreading throughout New York State. As of March 24th, there were over 25,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in New York, in 53 out of the state’s 62 counties, though many Upstate New York counties face shortages of medical supplies and cannot undertake extensive testing. Read more.

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Essex County health officials: We have supplies — for now

March 19, 2020

From Adirondack Daily Enterprise:

ELIZABETHTOWN — Amid concern over the spread of the novel coronavirus, public health officials on Wednesday sought to quell concerns about hospital capacity and testing capabilities — while conceding that sustaining a stable supply of... continue

From Adirondack Daily Enterprise:

ELIZABETHTOWN — Amid concern over the spread of the novel coronavirus, public health officials on Wednesday sought to quell concerns about hospital capacity and testing capabilities — while conceding that sustaining a stable supply of protective equipment and testing materials would likely be a challenge.

At a press conference on coronavirus outside the Essex County complex in Elizabethtown, representatives from both Adirondack Health and the UVM-Elizabethtown Community Hospital said their hospitals have enough supplies to continue testing those with suspected cases of COVID-19 — for now.

Read more.

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North Elba transfer station to stop accepting glass March 1

March 09, 2020

From Lake Placid News:

LAKE PLACID — The town of North Elba’s Recycling and Transfer Station will stop accepting glass starting March 1.

The transfer station will still accept redeemable glass bottles, but locals turning in non-redeemable glass items will... continue

From Lake Placid News:

LAKE PLACID — The town of North Elba’s Recycling and Transfer Station will stop accepting glass starting March 1.

The transfer station will still accept redeemable glass bottles, but locals turning in non-redeemable glass items will now have to pay to discard them. The town charges 9 cents per pound of garbage. Revenue generated from the redeemable bottles and cans go to local nonprofit organizations, according to the town’s website.

Town Councilor Richard Cummings suggested the town move forward with the change at the council’s meeting Tuesday, Feb. 11.

“There’s no market for glass,” he said.

The transfer station is open from 8 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. every day except Thursday, Sunday and holidays.

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Help Prevent an Adirondack Drinking Water Crisis

March 09, 2020

Clean water is the lifeblood of the Adirondack Park. However, the excessive application of road salt on state roadways is contaminating our surface waters and drinking water wells and it’s happening at an alarming rate.

A study of 500 wells across the Adirondacks found that... continue

Clean water is the lifeblood of the Adirondack Park. However, the excessive application of road salt on state roadways is contaminating our surface waters and drinking water wells and it’s happening at an alarming rate.

A study of 500 wells across the Adirondacks found that more than half of the private wells exceeded safe sodium levels and more than a quarter exceeded chloride guidelines. To learn more, click HERE.

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NYS Aquatic Invasive Species Bill Now in Committee

February 25, 2020

Legislation to extend protections against the spread of Aquatic Invasive Species is now making its way through the NYS Legislature.  

This bill:

"Extends provisions relating to the department of environmental conservation's management of... continue

Legislation to extend protections against the spread of Aquatic Invasive Species is now making its way through the NYS Legislature.  

This bill:

"Extends provisions relating to the department of environmental conservation's management of aquatic invasive species, spread prevention and penalties"

We know how important this is to your lake association.  As such, we encourage you to contact your representatives in Albany and make your voice heard.

Click here for more information.
 

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Adirondack Land Trust Conserves Upper Saranac Shoreline

January 24, 2020

From the Adirondack Explore 1/24/20:

The Adirondack Land Trust announced Friday that it has purchased Upper Saranac Lake property that once belonged to early Adirondack conservationist Clarence Petty’s family, preserving 570 feet of rugged shoreline on an interstate canoe... continue

From the Adirondack Explore 1/24/20:

The Adirondack Land Trust announced Friday that it has purchased Upper Saranac Lake property that once belonged to early Adirondack conservationist Clarence Petty’s family, preserving 570 feet of rugged shoreline on an interstate canoe route.

The trust last week paid $200,000 to Ed and Teresa Palen, of Keene, for 5 acres with a boulder-edged shore between Indian Carry and Indian Point on the lake’s south side. Department of Environmental Conservation — lived their first 

Read more.

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Mountain Village Embraces Its Legacy As Cure Center For TB

January 16, 2020

SARANAC LAKE, N.Y. (AP) 12/1/19: 

Through the middle of the 20th century, ailing people seeking a “rest cure” reclined on cottage porches in the community to take in the crisp Adirondack Mountain air. Saranac Lake grew into a mini-metropolis of medical care, with... continue

SARANAC LAKE, N.Y. (AP) 12/1/19: 

Through the middle of the 20th century, ailing people seeking a “rest cure” reclined on cottage porches in the community to take in the crisp Adirondack Mountain air. Saranac Lake grew into a mini-metropolis of medical care, with a dozen trains chugging in and out daily, a famous mountainside tuberculosis sanitorium, hotels — and three undertakers.

Read more. 

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Proposed Changes To Remsen-Lake Placid Corridor

December 06, 2019

From DEC: The Remsen-Lake Placid Travel Corridor is a railroad right-of-way approximately 119 miles long and generally 100 feet wide. Constructed in 1892, the line was operated continuously until freight service ceased in 1972. In 1974, the Corridor was purchased by New York State. In... continue

From DEC: The Remsen-Lake Placid Travel Corridor is a railroad right-of-way approximately 119 miles long and generally 100 feet wide. Constructed in 1892, the line was operated continuously until freight service ceased in 1972. In 1974, the Corridor was purchased by New York State. In 1977, the State leased the line to the Adirondack Railway Corporation. After the bankruptcy of the lessee, and following a long period of litigation, the State acquired the remainder of the lease in 1991. Title to the Corridor remains under the jurisdiction of the Department of Transportation (DOT). Read more.

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New Law Will Require All Boaters To Take Boating Course

August 17, 2019

The new law will gradually be phased in until all boaters of all ages have passed the boating course by 2025. You will be required to show a certificate that you have completed the course.

The new law will gradually be phased in until all boaters of all ages have passed the boating course by 2025. You will be required to show a certificate that you have completed the course.

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